Due to its construction and function, the knee joint is a joint susceptible to damage. The knee joint consists of a large bone (the femur) in the upper leg and the shin bone (tibia) and calf bone (fibula) in the lower leg. To ensure a better joint between the bones of the lower leg and the upper leg, two menisci are located between the two halves of the leg. An inner (medial) and an outer (lateral) meniscus. The menisci are made from cartilage and as well as a control function, also have an important task in shock absorbance.

At the front of the knee is the kneecap or patella. The kneecap is embedded in the tendon of the knee’s large extensor. The bones of the upper and lower leg are held together by the capsula on the inside and outside, supported by ligaments (inner = medial collateral ligament) (outer = lateral collateral ligament). Right at the centre of the joint, the upper and lower leg are held together by the cruciate ligaments.

An acute injury to the knee occurs generally as a result of an uncontrolled movement (as a result of which the coordination between the upper leg and the lower leg fails to function), a collision with another player, or a fall. In any of these events, the ligaments and/or menisci may be damaged. Such injuries must always be examined by a sport physiotherapist, sport physician and/or orthopaedic specialist.

The ligaments on the side generally heal without an operative intervention. The cruciate ligaments do not recover by themselves. An operation is not always necessary. Depending on the level of sport in which you are involved, and the nature of the daily activities of the individual, the decision must be taken as to whether an operation is or is not necessary. It is possible to function without cruciate ligaments. This will affect what treatment is chosen, and whether or not to operate. To have any chance of once again achieving your previous level of sport activity, a number of months strenuous rehabilitation will be necessary, in order to be able to correctly control all the muscles of the knee joint, and to make them strong enough. To support the knee when returning to sport, the Push Sports Knee Brace is an excellent choice.

An overuse injury is caused because the burden to which the knee joint is exposed is greater than the amount of load the knee joint can cope with. Commonly occurring overuse injuries around the knee are meniscus injuries, injuries to the tendons of the large extensor and injuries around the kneecap (patella).

Pain around and behind the kneecap without any clear damage to the tendon tissue, the bone and cartilage is common. The overburdening of the muscle and tendon attachments is one of the possible causes for pain around the kneecap. Overloading of the tendon at the underside of the kneecap is often known as ‘jumpers knee’. If the pain is localised more behind the kneecap, this is described as a patellofemoral pain syndrome. The cause is more likely to be the functioning of the kneecap. The possible causes of this are diverse. Poor sport shoes, a congenital defect, poorly structured training, excessive jumping, hard (non-absorbent) surface are just a few of the many possible causes.

For the correct diagnosis, it is worthwhile to visit a sport physiotherapist and/or sport physician. A Push Sports Patella Brace can considerably reduce the perceived pain.

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