Tennis is a sport that is played on a large scale, by an extended age group. There are more than 700,000 members of the tennis association. Membership of a tennis club often demonstrates a wide age range. Competition matches are often played, even at mature age. Tennis injuries often affect the arms, calves and ankles.

Ankle
The most commonly occurring injury in tennis is a sprained or twisted ankle. In most cases, the injury occurs following a landing on the outside of the foot, whereby the sole of the foot twists too far inwards. On the outside of the foot, capsula, ligaments and nerve fibre can be damaged due to overstretching. On the inside, cartilage can be damaged by excessive compression. Depending on the seriousness of the injury, the tissue on the outside is either stretched or torn. This damage causes bleeding in the ankle. As a result, the ankle swells, (after a short time) bruises and becomes painful.
The damaged tissue heals naturally just like a wound on the skin. However, muscle and nerve fibre does not automatically regain its original function. Muscle and nerve fibre must be trained. This is possible with simple balance exercises. In addition, the ankle must be protected to prevent the risk of recurrence. A Push Sports Ankle Brace is an excellent solution.
One important and simple measure for reducing the risk of ankle injury is to ensure that all loose balls are removed from the court. In this way, at least stepping on a ball will never be the cause of an ankle injury.

Calf
A common injury in tennis is what is known as “lawn tennis leg”. Lawn tennis leg is a (minor) tear in the calf muscle or calf strain. The sensation is similar to that of a whip crack at the moment the muscle tears. As well as considerable pain, it is no longer possible to complete the normal placement of the foot. It takes six weeks before the tear is fully healed. A possible cause is insufficient or no warming up.

Knee
The knee is a joint susceptible to injury. The knee joint can be damaged by twisting. In such a twisting incident (cruciate) ligaments and meniscus tissue can be damaged. Injury to the meniscus can cause swelling and it may no longer be possible to correctly bend and extend the knee. Serious injury to the cruciate ligaments often causes internal bleeding or accumulation of fluid. The knee then feels swollen and warm, is painful and no longer moves well. In the event of a serious twisted knee, knee cruciate ligaments and the inner meniscus are often both damaged. If injury to the cruciate ligaments is suspected, it is important that the correct diagnosis be made by a sport physician and/or sport physiotherapist. During and following recovery from a knee injury, it may be worthwhile to protect the knee (during sport) with a Push Sports Knee Brace.

 

Quadriceps
The attachment of this muscle below the knee can cause pain problems due to overburdening. This is a common occurrence amongst young sportsmen and women who have undergone a growth spurt. The bones first increase in length, followed only then by the muscles and tendons. Many young sportsmen and women start to participate more frequently in sport, specifically in the period when they experience growth spurts As a result, particularly this muscle attachment can become strained. The pain is generally below the kneecap (=patella). A Push Sports Patella Brace can reduce the main problem in many cases.

Wrist
Overuse or tendinopathy of one of the tendons around the wrist is a common tennis injury. Both on the dominant and the non-dominant side (with two-handed strokes). If the muscles in the wrist stabilise insufficiently when hitting a ball, the tendons can become damaged by overstretching.
Wearing a Push Sports Wrist Brace can help the wrist, giving the damaged tissue an opportunity to recover. The brace can also be worn outside sport, in the immediate aftermath of the injury. It is also important to carry out muscle-strengthening exercises for the wrist. It is wise to obtain good advice as to whether the grip and tensioning of the tennis racket are correct.

(Tennis) elbow
A tennis elbow is generally caused by overburdening of the extensors of the wrist. If the player suffers from this problem, pain will occur at the attachment of these muscles on the outside of the elbow. The slightest lifting and twisting movement such as holding a cup of tea, shaking hands, opening a door or washing up can cause extreme pain with tennis elbow. During tennis, the pain is generally felt during backhand strokes.
Wearing a Push Sports Elbow Brace can reduce the pain. To cure yourself of the tennis arm it is important to find the cause. The cause may be a poor backhand technique, the wrong tension or grip of the racket.

Matching injuries

Knee injury

Knee injury

Patella injury

Patella injury

Elbow injury

Elbow injury

Thumb injury

Thumb injury

Ankle injury

Ankle injury

Wrist injury

Wrist injury

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