Hockey is one of the fastest growing sports in the Netherlands. With more than 180,000 participants, Hockey is the second team sport in the Netherlands, after football. Injuries in hockey above all occur as a result of contact with other players, the ball, the stick and the field. The most commonly occurring hockey injuries are ankle, knee, finger/thumb, hamstrings, shin, thigh and facial injuries.

Ankle
The most commonly occurring injury in hockey is a sprained or twisted ankle. In most cases, the injury occurs following a landing on the outside of the foot, whereby the sole of the foot twists too far inwards. On the outside of the foot, capsula, ligaments and nerve fibre can be damaged due to overstretching. On the inside, cartilage can be damaged by excessive compression. Depending on the seriousness of the injury, the tissue on the outside is either stretched or torn. This damage causes bleeding in the ankle. As a result, the ankle swells, (after a short time) bruises and becomes painful.
The damaged tissue heals naturally just like a wound on the skin. However, muscle and nerve fibre does not automatically regain its original function. Muscle and nerve fibre must be trained. This is possible with simple balance exercises. In addition, the ankle must be protected to prevent the risk of recurrence. A Push Sports Ankle Brace is an excellent solution.
One important and simple measure for reducing the risk of ankle injury is to remove unused balls from the field. In this way, at least stepping on a ball will never be the cause of an ankle injury.

Knee
The knee is a joint susceptible to injury. The knee joint can be damaged through twisting. In such a twisting incident (cruciate) ligaments and meniscus tissue can be damaged. Injury to the meniscus can cause swelling and it may no longer be possible to correctly bend and extend the knee. Series injury to the cruciate ligaments often causes internal bleeding or accumulation of fluid. The knee then feels swollen and warm, is painful and no longer moves well.
In the event of a serious twisted knee, knee cruciate ligaments and the inner meniscus are often both damaged. If injury to the cruciate ligaments is suspected, it is important that the correct diagnosis be made by a sport physician and/or sport physiotherapist. During and following recovery from a knee injury, it may be worthwhile to protect the knee (during sport) with a Push Sports Knee Brace.

Wrist
A wrist injury in hockey is not particularly common. A wrist injury in hockey is generally the result of a fall. Depending on the position of your hand, tissues in and around the wrist joint can be overstretched or overcompressed. As a result of the stretching, the wrist ligament can be damaged. The hard compression can cause damage to the cartilage within the wrist joint. As a result of the damage, bleeding can occur in the joint. This bleeding causes pain and swelling.
Wearing a Push Sports Wrist Brace can help to stabilise the wrist giving the damaged tissue a chance to recover. The brace can also be worn outside sport, in the immediate aftermath of the injury.

Finger, thumb, shin and thigh
Finger, thumb, shin and thigh can easily become bruised during hockey, during hard contact with a stick or the ball. This generally causes nothing more than sometimes considerable bruising. This can be very painful but will heal itself.
The shin can be protected by wearing shinguards. In addition, in a number of play situations, protective gloves and a mask can prevent injuries.

Face
A face injury often looks worse than it is, because wounds to the face can bleed heavily. To prevent serious damage to the teeth, wearing a gum shield is recommended.

Hamstring
Hamstring injuries are generally acute injuries. Both a small and large muscle tear need time to heal. It often takes six weeks before a tear has healed. The difficulty with a tear in the hamstring is that its presence is no longer felt after a much shorter time. However, as soon as the sportsman once again sprints at maximum effort, it becomes clear that the injury has not fully healed. The muscle tissue must then once again handle too much power. The healing of the hamstring really takes six weeks. Supervision by an expert sport physiotherapist and/or sport masseur can prevent this problem.

Matching injuries

Knee injury

Knee injury

Patella injury

Patella injury

Elbow injury

Elbow injury

Thumb injury

Thumb injury

Ankle injury

Ankle injury

Wrist injury

Wrist injury

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